Pyrenean Mountain Dog

Although the Great Pyrenees are first and foremost guards and watchmen, they can also be affectionate "bears" around a loved one. If you look back at the breed's past, where they were the first helpers of shepherds, this dog is 100% trained to be independent. That's why they're not as attached to their owners as some other breeds, but they'll always be glad to spend an hour or two lounging on the couch with you or playing with your favorite toy.

Table of contents

Breed Information
Another Name
Great Pyrenees, Patou
Origin
France
Height
Males 70-80 cm
Females 65-75 cm
Weight
15-25 kg
Fur
Medium
Colors
White, yellowish-brown, gray
Lifespan
15-17 years
ICF Classification
Pinschers and Schnauzers, Molossers, Mountain Dogs and Swiss Cattle Dogs
Group
Protection dogs (guard dogs)
Price
From $500

Breed photos

Features of the breed

Intellect
9/10
Energy
9/10
Health
9/10
Guarding
9/10
Love for Kids
7/10
Care
7/10
Easy nutrition
8/10
Training needs
7/10
Tendency to be trained
5/10
Molting
8/10
Communication
9/10
Anger
6/10

History of Origin

There is still no exact date of origin of the Pyrenean Mountain Dog. It is believed that the breed was bred around the 15th century. There are many theories and speculations about who is considered the ancestor of the species. We came across a text by the monastery’s abbot, the monk Miguel Augustine, which dates back to 1617, where the Great Pyrenees were described in detail.

Monk, in his text, gives us a complete picture of the breed, stating that the Pyrenean shepherd dog is a favorite of shepherds. It is undoubtedly a good guardian and helper. The dog must necessarily be white to always be in sight of the shepherd. And also lightweight to be agile in its movements and endurance in case of a fight with a wolf. Based on this, Miguel Augustin distinguished several types of breed: the West Pyrenean mountain sheepdog and the East Pyrenean mountain sheepdog, which just had a lighter weight, slimmer, and more prominent appearance.

By the end of the 17th century, large Pyrenean Mountain Dogs served as guards for herds and became popular among the aristocracy. They were used as guards for their palaces. By 1933, the American Kennel Club recognized the breed and granted permission to enter any club competitions. During World War II, the breed survived because many dogs were kept in an isolated kennel away from the fighting. Today, the dog is famous in America, Japan, and Europe. The Pyrenean shepherd also continues to be used now by French farmers to guard livestock.

Appearance: height, weight, fur, color

Pyrenean sheepdogs are harmonious and elegant dogs. They look quite refined but at the same time imposing. Their physique is muscular and robust. The wool is of medium length but very thick. The head is not roughly shaped, wedge-shaped. The ears hang down. The tail is longer than average.

The Character

Although the Great Pyrenees are first and foremost guards and watchmen, they can also be affectionate “bears” around a loved one. If you look back at the breed’s past, where they were the first helpers of shepherds, this dog is 100% trained to be independent. That’s why they’re not as attached to their owners as some other breeds, but they’ll always be glad to spend an hour or two lounging on the couch with you or playing with your favorite toy. And even with this developed independence, a pet still wants to be on the same wavelength as its owner.

If you fear breeds of this size and cannot show leadership in raising a Pyrenean Mountain Dog, you might want to think about choosing another dog. The Pyrenean Mountain Dog is not aggressive unless required in a situation where you need to stand up for the owner. With children, the relationship is good, trusting. Other animals in the family will take calmly, but strangers will drive away because of their watchdog and shepherd signs.

The ideal place to keep such a dog would be its own home with a spacious yard, where it will feel most comfortable. In the warmer seasons, a garden or terrace is an excellent place to play together and have a good time.

Care

The Great Pyrenees are extremely easy to care for. Their hair is both long (most often also white), pliable, and not clogged in tangles, from which it isn’t easy to get rid of. But a few times a week, it is better to give half an hour to comb it out. It is essential not to bathe your pet too often. This can lead to a coarse coat and dry skin, leading to unpleasant flaking. Otherwise, the standard advice is to inspect and clean the eyes and ears three times a week. And nails should be trimmed several times a month.

Training

Intelligence, like stubbornness, comes first in the Pyrenean Mountain Dog. Not for nothing, there is even an expression: “Pyrenean look”, which denotes the strength of intelligence and wisdom of the breed. You will have to compete with the pet in stubbornness if you want to achieve any training results. Be more confident and persistent in his training so that the process takes as little time as possible and leads you to success.

Common diseases

The Pyrenean Mountain Dog is a breed that is known for good health. There are no hereditary chronic diseases, and the Great Pyrenees rarely get sick. One condition that has occurred is hip or elbow dysplasia.

Nutrition

The diet should be balanced and as close to natural as possible. That is, the portion should consist of 2/3 of protein foods and 1/3 of fats and carbohydrates. It is recommended to include dairy products as well. The Great Pyrenees are not prone to allergies, which means you can experiment with their diet. But remember that this breed has a slow metabolism, so they don’t need large portions.